Surgeon shares treasures from private museum

Staff photo by Mary Kemper Dr. Luis Villar, who practices cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in Stuart, stands next to a Cold War-era Russian MIG trainer aircraft at Witham Field during a reception he held Nov. 22.

Staff photo by Mary Kemper
Dr. Luis Villar, who practices cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in Stuart, stands next to a Cold War-era Russian MIG trainer aircraft at Witham Field during a reception he held Nov. 22.

Mary Kemper
Staff Writer
On an overcast and windy Nov. 22, scores of people nevertheless enjoyed a reception held by Stuart plastic surgeon Dr. Luis Villar, who shared his private aviation museum and aircraft under reconstruction.
Located at Witham Field, Villar’s hangar is filled with aviation memorabilia from flight’s earliest days on up to Cold-War era planes.
By itself, the museum is a trove of artifacts from days gone by, as well as hundreds of models of aircraft and ships.
“This ‘gentleman’ is wearing the uniform of the 7th Cavalry just before World War I, during the hunt for Pancho Villa in Mexico,” Villar explained during a personally conducted tour of the museum. He referred to a mannequin on display, along with weapons and other artifacts.
“Next to him is a doctor from the very same mission. Note the Gillette razor, and the blades. They’re exactly the same as are used today,” he said.

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Story behind ‘to the shores of Tripoli’

Source: Wikimedia Commons This painting depicts the USS Philadelphia, previously captured by the Tripolitans, ablaze after she was boarded by Stephen Decatur and 60 men and set afire, making their escape in the ketch Intrepid, depicted in the foreground, in 1804.

Source: Wikimedia Commons
This painting depicts the USS Philadelphia, previously captured by the Tripolitans, ablaze after she was boarded by Stephen Decatur and 60 men and set afire, making their escape in the ketch Intrepid, depicted in the foreground, in 1804.

Brevard Veterans Council Inc.
For Veteran Voice
Most Americans are unaware of the fact that more than 200 years ago, the United States declared war on Islamic terrorism, and Thomas Jefferson led the charge!
At the height of the 18th century, Muslim pirates were the terror of the Mediterranean and a large area of the North Atlantic seas.
They attacked every ship in sight, and held the crews for exorbitant ransoms. Those taken hostage were subjected to barbaric treatment and wrote heart-breaking letters back home, begging their government and family members to pay whatever their captors demanded.
These extortionists of the high seas represented the Islamic nations of Tripoli, Tunis, Morocco and Algiers — collectively referred to as the Barbary Coast — and presented a dangerous and unprovoked threat to the new American republic.
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