72 years on, it’s still a joyful memory

Source: Department of Defense/Wikimedia Commons Crowds of Parisians celebrating the entry of Allied troops into Paris Aug. 26, 1944, scatter for cover as a sniper fires from a building on the Place de la Concorde. Although the Germans surrendered the city, small bands of snipers still remained.

Source: Department of Defense/Wikimedia Commons
Crowds of Parisians celebrating the entry of Allied troops into Paris Aug. 26, 1944, scatter for cover as a sniper fires from a building on the Place de la Concorde. Although the Germans surrendered the city, small bands of snipers still remained.

Mary Kemper/Staff Writer
mkemper@veteranvoiceweekly.com

Seventy-two years ago this week, the Allies of World War II swept triumphantly into Paris and liberated the city. Throngs of joyful French citizens flooded the streets, cheering wildly and pelting the soldiers with flowers, kisses, and of course, wine.

A lot of things went on behind the scenes ahead of that happy event, and even on the first day, many civilians lost their lives. But as everyone knows, the Allied juggernaut could not be stopped.

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VA report confirms suicides higher among veterans

Myra Brazell

Myra Brazell is the suicide prevention coordinator at the Orlando VA Medical Center. This month the Department of Veterans Affairs released a large report about veteran suicide. It confirmed what many suspect — veterans have an above average rate of death by suicide.

By Patrick McCallister/For Veteran Voice

Science confirms what many suspect — death by suicide is higher among veterans than others. After adjusting for age and gender differences between veterans and non-veteran populations, veterans are on average about 21 percent more likely to commit suicide than others.

This month the Department of Veteran Affairs released the report “Suicide Among Veterans and Other Americans.” The report looked at trends from 2001 to 2014.

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