VA’s Hepatitis C treatments really work

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs Vietnam Veteran Jack Flowers says a VA employee ‘saved his life’ in helping him find treatment for Hepatitis C.

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs
Vietnam Veteran Jack Flowers says a VA employee ‘saved his life’ in helping him find treatment for Hepatitis C.

Patrick McCallister
For Veteran Voice
Hepatitis C can be cured. The Department of Veteran Affairs’ Veterans Health Administration is reaching out to diagnosed veterans to get in to get cured.
“Over the last two years, maybe three, there have been some pretty amazing drugs that have come out on the market,” Nick Beckey, chief of pharmacy service at the West Palm Beach VA Medical Center said.
The center sent letters to known affected veterans earlier this month. The letter says that since 2014 the center has treated more than 530 veterans with hepatitis C with a 90 to 95 percent cure rate. Fewer than 10 stopped treatments due to side effects.
“All of these drugs are very tolerable,” Beckey said.
That’s important, because previous treatments with lower success rates — 30 to 60 percent — were hard to take. Firstly, they were painful injections. Secondly, they caused severe flu-like symptoms. The injections seemed like a case of the treatment being worse than the disease.
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Little Big Horn was first 9/11

Photo supplied by Brady National  Photographic  Art Gallery This photo of ill-fated Army Gen. George A. Custer was taken sometime between 1860 and 1865, while Custer was serving in the Civil War.

Photo supplied by
Brady National
Photographic
Art Gallery
This photo of ill-fated Army Gen. George A. Custer was taken sometime between 1860 and 1865, while Custer was serving in the Civil War.

Mary Kemper
Staff Writer
When the news flew over the telegraph on June 25, 1876, no one could believe it. In fact, many newspapers recorded it as yet another glorious victory for the storied and dashing Gen. George Armstrong Custer.
In fact, it was a disaster of the first magnitude. Lakota and Cheyenne warriors wiped out an entire battalion of the 7th Cavalry Division, Custer along with it.
The Battle of the Little Big Horn happened just at the time America was celebrating its Centennial. For many, it was an optimistic time — new lands were opening up for settlement, the two coasts were joined by a transcontinental railroad, a new gold supply had been found in the Black Hills of Dakota Territory, and the sky seemed the limit to what Americans could achieve.
White Americans, that is. The Native Americans had a different view.
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